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Absolution by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Everyone has something that school managed to ruin for them. For me it was football (okay, this one’s a joke), calculus (can’t say I’m too upset) and F. Scott Fitzgerald.

Now, the latter is a bit of a mystery. I know I read The Great Gatsby in school and was almost certainly forced to deconstruct it down to the molecular level and then document the carnage.

Strange thing is that I remember none of this, but I’ve had an absolute aversion (think Clockwork Orange) to Mr. Fitzgerald for ages. This puzzles me. Usually, I can explain in great ranting detail why I don’t like something.

For hours if left unchecked.

But I cannot tell you why this aversion to FSF. So last night I pulled an (unread) copy of the Viking Portable collection (edited by Dorthy Parker) and read a short story called Absolution. It was magnificent. (Doubly recommended if you had a Catholic upbringing.)

I absolutely refuse to give a summary, because I can’t stand that kind of review and also because nothing that I can say will give you any idea about it. You just have to read it. But I will give you one sentence:

“There was something ineffably gorgeous somewhere that had nothing to do with God.”

Go find a copy and read it.

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One Response to “Absolution by F. Scott Fitzgerald”

  1. Levné repasované notebooky a počítače, repasovaný notebook na prodej, servis notebooků, výprodeje notebooků, nejlevnější notebooky
    May 28th, 2012 12:19
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    Levné repasované notebooky a počítače, repasovaný notebook na prodej, servis notebooků, výprodeje notebooků, nejlevnější notebooky…

    […]Blasted Members - I love Books. Good Books. Reviews, author information, book-related news and quality literary web links. Enjoy! » Blog Archive » Absolution by F. Scott Fitzgerald[…]…

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